Rotterdam 2057 – The Future Will Be History

The front of the publication showing a map of rotterdam and a placeholder overlay.
The table of contents is visible on the outside of the book to help navigation between projects.
The table of contents presents an overview of the contained projects based on their tags.
A title page introduces this specific project section.
An example page from project section in the publication.
The first poster in a sequential series is added inbetween the regular pages, explaining the process of choicemaking in six illustrated steps.
Close-up of the first poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
The second poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
Close-up of the second poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
An example page from project section in the publication.
The third poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
Close-up of the third poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
The fourth poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
An example page from project section in the publication.
The fifth poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
Close-up of the fifth poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking.
The sixth and final poster in the series explaining part of the process of choicemaking. The poster links back to the first, emphasizing the circular nature of this type of choicemaking.
The final page of the project section closes with a statement.
Info
Title: Rotterdam 2057
Subtitle: The Future Will Be History
Type: Print; Hardcover; Paperback; Assignment
Type.dimensions: 420 × 297 × 30 mm (exhibition version); 297 × 210 × 25 mm
Type.pages: 528 pages
Type.printing: Full-colour process (CMYK); Double sided
Type.edition: Single copy (exhibition version); Limited copies
Designer.name: A. G. (Alex) Starr; A. (Alma) de Ricou; B. F. (Beth Frost) Bennett; B. (Bjorn) Planken; B. (Boudewijn) van Diepen; C. (Camilla) Lonis; C. (Cees) Boot; C. (Chris) Bijdevaate; C. (Claudia) Schoenmaker; C. (Coen) van Leeuwen; D. R. (Danuta) de Vries; D. R. (Daphne) de Vries; D. (Debbie) van der Zee; D. (Denise) Nuijen; D. (Djamika) Smith; E. (Eva) Harmsen; F. (Fabian) Hahne; F. (Femke) Bakker; F. N. (Fernando) van der Vlist; G. (Guillaume) Mourot; H. (Helen) Boon; J. (Jetske) Voorneveld; J. (Joan) Godyla; J. (Johan) Vallet; J. (Joris) de Longh; J. (Julie) Galand; K. (Karen) Mertens; K. (Karston) Smith; L. (Lisette) van Veluw; L. (Lysiane) Bollenbach; M. (Marcel) Wilmink; M. (Marco) van Zomeren; M. (Margareth) Józefczak; M. (Margriet) Straatman; M. (Marianne) Blokland; M. (Marthe) Verweij; M. (Martijn) van Bachum; M. (Mathieu) Cremers; M. (Max) Braams; M. (Merel) Maltha; M. (Mieke) de Bruijn; M. (Mignonne) Meekels; P. (Pieter) Hartkoorn; P. (Péter) Szalayc; R. A. (Rachel) Kim; R. (Rik) Speel; R. (Robbert) de Groot; R. (Robin) de Kok; S. (Sanja) de Vries; S. (Saïd) Lachleb; S. (Sharon) Snoep; S. (Sonia) Dominguez; S. (Sophie) Mittelberg; S. (Sunah) Lee; T. (Tessa) Meeus; T. (Thijs) de Jong; T. (Tim) Hölscher; W. (Willem) de Kam; W. (William Mooijman); Y. (Yingying) Ye; Y. (Yuri) Vlassak
Designer.affiliation: School of Media & Design, Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences
Author.name: A. G. (Alex) Starr; A. (Alma) de Ricou; B. F. (Beth Frost) Bennett; B. (Bjorn) Planken; B. (Boudewijn) van Diepen; C. (Camilla) Lonis; C. (Cees) Boot; C. (Chris) Bijdevaate; C. (Claudia) Schoenmaker; C. (Coen) van Leeuwen; D. R. (Danuta) de Vries; D. R. (Daphne) de Vries; D. (Debbie) van der Zee; D. (Denise) Nuijen; D. (Djamika) Smith; E. (Eva) Harmsen; F. (Fabian) Hahne; F. (Femke) Bakker; F. N. (Fernando) van der Vlist; G. (Guillaume) Mourot; H. (Helen) Boon; J. (Jetske) Voorneveld; J. (Joan) Godyla; J. (Johan) Vallet; J. (Joris) de Longh; J. (Julie) Galand; K. (Karen) Mertens; K. (Karston) Smith; L. (Lisette) van Veluw; L. (Lysiane) Bollenbach; M. (Marcel) Wilmink; M. (Marco) van Zomeren; M. (Margareth) Józefczak; M. (Margriet) Straatman; M. (Marianne) Blokland; M. (Marthe) Verweij; M. (Martijn) van Bachum; M. (Mathieu) Cremers; M. (Max) Braams; M. (Merel) Maltha; M. (Mieke) de Bruijn; M. (Mignonne) Meekels; P. (Pieter) Hartkoorn; P. (Péter) Szalayc; R. A. (Rachel) Kim; R. (Rik) Speel; R. (Robbert) de Groot; R. (Robin) de Kok; S. (Sanja) de Vries; S. (Saïd) Lachleb; S. (Sharon) Snoep; S. (Sonia) Dominguez; S. (Sophie) Mittelberg; S. (Sunah) Lee; T. (Tessa) Meeus; T. (Thijs) de Jong; T. (Tim) Hölscher; W. (Willem) de Kam; W. (William Mooijman); Y. (Yingying) Ye; Y. (Yuri) Vlassak
Author.affiliation: School of Media & Design, Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences
Instructor.name: R. (Roger) Teeuwen; M. (Mark) Mulder; K. M. (Karin) Mientjes; B. H. J. (Bart) Siebelink
Instructor.affiliation: Dept. of Graphic Design, Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences
Description.note: This publication was accompanied by the exhibition Rotterdam 2057 at BLAAK10 Gallery & Store.
Description: Rotterdam 2057 is the result of a collaboration between 60 graphic design students that culminated in an interactive exhibition and the publication of this book. The book is a compilation of thirty-six different visions of the city in the year 2057 on three scales: world (Rotterdam as microcosm), city, and people.
The twenty-second section is a satire on “The Wonderful World of Choicemania”. In it, I focus on the human implications of future predictions, rather than repeating some severely overstated technological solutionism or technological-deterministic views. In order to do so, the scientific framework of game theory is connected to the social-psychological ramifications of excessive choice in everyday life (e.g. identity management). From social psychology, I borrow in particular from Barry Schwartz's influential book The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2005). I do so to develop a series of statements that reinforce the overall point regarding how we are headed towards a world of excessive choice, supported by an ideological construct that beliefs in the idea that more choice equals more freedom. From game theory, the notion of strategic choicemaking is therefore adopted to ridicule its fundamental promise of freedom. This is satirically visualised as a series of six steps that are presented as aids in the choice-making processs.
The overall design of this section reflects the conflicts between these two frameworks of identity and self-management on the one hand (e.g. the fact that we get to invent rather than inherit an identity), and the implications of excessive everyday choice-making on the other (e.g. spreads on strategic choicemaking about such issues). The former uses blue and white colours, hinting at Facebook's colour schemes, while the latter uses red and yellow, which hints at the concept of conspicuous consumption. Throughout, the two separate points-of-view are thus intertwined both visually and substantively. In short, the ideology of a world where more choice equals more freedom is thus ridiculed by drawing it into extremes.
Printer: Jong & Goed
Printer.place: Rotterdam, the Netherlands
Date.submitted: 27 Apr. 2011
Date.published: 12 May 2011
Language: English (United Kingdom); Dutch (The Netherlands)
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